Ebola Response: Frequently Asked Questions


Updated 11.7.14
Please note the information below is current as of the posted date. As new information is available, some of the procedures detailed below may change. Please check back regurlarly for updated information.

BACKGROUND

  1. NEW! How long does the Ebola virus live on a surface? What is the proper way to decontaminate surfaces if a patient screens positive for Ebola?
  2. What do I need to know about Ebola?
  3. What are the symptoms associated with Ebola?
  4. Will survival rates for Ebola patients be better in the U.S. than they are in West Africa?
  5. Why do some people survive Ebola while others do not?
  6. What is the likelihood of Texas Children’s treating an Ebola patient in the near future?

TEXAS CHILDREN’S PREPAREDNESS

  1. How is Texas Children’s preparing for the possibility of receiving a patient with Ebola?
  2. Where would we care for a patient with Ebola?

SCREENING

  1. NEW! How are patients being screened at the Information or Welcome Desks?
  2. NEW! How will Blood Bank handle type and screens? Will there be designated equipment to handle blood samples?
  3. NEW! Are people that are screening patients for Ebola wearing PPE?
  4. NEW! Why are we not screening visitors and how are we ensuring the typical screening process is occurring after hours? Will the screening process change if additional countries have outbreaks?
  5. NEW! How are we adjusting to the newly-released updated PPE recommendations?
  6. NEW! What is the screening process if a mother arrives for precipitous delivery?
  7. NEW! Will there be signage posted for visitors discouraging them from visiting if they have symptoms of illness similar to signage used during the H1N1 flu season?
  8. What are Texas Children’s protocols for screening patients for Ebola?
  9. What happens if a patient’s screening is positive and they have suspected Ebola?
  10. How are our Ambulatory practices and Perioperative areas being prepped for a situation where a patient with Ebola presents at one of their locations?
  11. Are we screening visitors for Ebola?

PERSONAL SAFETY OF THE HEALTH CARE TEAM

  1. NEW! Why is the PPE used here different from that in Africa and why does it vary from the PPE recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention?
  2. NEW! How are we adjusting to the newly-released updated PPE recommendations?
  3. What steps are being taken to make sure our employees will remain safe in the case that we receive an Ebola patient?
  4. Which employees are being trained to care for patients with Ebola?
  5. After caring for the patient with Ebola, how do I decontaminate myself before I leave TCH?
  6. Once I’ve cared for a patient with Ebola, is it safe to return home without exposing my family?

CARE AND TREATMENT OF EBOLA PATIENTS

  1. NEW! Will we receive or send patients to/from other hospitals? What will happen if a woman at the Pavilion for Women is suspected to have Ebola?
  2. NEW! What are our transportation protocols within the hospital for possible Ebola patients?
  3. NEW! What happens if we have more than one patient with Ebola at a time? Is there more than one bed designated to care for these patients?
  4. NEW! Will we transfer the patient to one of the “specialized” hospitals?
  5. NEW! Can a staff person who cares for an Ebola patient stay at the hospital if he/she chooses to?
  6. NEW! Can family members of suspected Ebola patients stay with them? How many? Do they need PPE?
  7. NEW! If I take care of an Ebola patient and then return to work, will I take care of other patients or is there a quarantine period?
  8. NEW! Who is part of the “Ebola” core team?
  9. What is the treatment regimen for an Ebola patient?
  10. Can a healthcare worker refuse to care for a patient with Ebola?
  11. Will health care workers who care for an Ebola patient treat other patients? What is the staffing plan?
  12. What isolation equipment will be used by staff?

EDUCATION AND EBOLA UPDATES

  1. How do we educate other patient families worried about their children being here in the case of a confirmed Ebola patient?
  2. How can I stay abreast of what we are doing at Texas Children’s regarding Ebola preparation, training, etc.?
  3. What should I do if the media contacts or questions me?
  4. Who can I contact if I still have questions?

 

BACKGROUND

1. How long does the Ebola virus live on a surface? What is the proper way to decontaminate surfaces if a patient screens positive for Ebola?
Ebola is relatively weak outside of the body and is killed by hospital-grade disinfectants. Ebola can survive for several hours on surfaces such as doorknobs and countertops and for several days at room temperature in body fluids (CDC). Routine cleaning processes currently in place at Texas Children’s will destroy any remnants of the virus. As an extra precaution, any room in which a patient with Ebola has been cared for will undergo detailed and specific cleaning processes as recommended by Infection Control. Back to top

2. What do I need to know about Ebola?
The Ebola virus disease is a severe, often fatal, illness in humans. The virus spreads in human populations through person-to-person transmission. While Ebola is easily transmitted, it requires direct contact with the body fluids (urine, feces, saliva, vomit, sweat, blood, and semen) of a person who has the infection. Ebola enters the body through broken skin or exposed mucous membranes. A person infected with Ebola cannot spread the virus until they are symptomatic. Although Ebola was first identified in the 1970’s, it was largely confined to rural areas with lower transmission rates whereas the current outbreak has been in urban settings in West Africa where transmission is much more likely. Over the last month, the number of new cases has been 1,000 per week with an average case fatality rate of more than 70 percent. The epidemic doubling time is currently about 20 days, which means the number of active cases of Ebola doubles every 20 days. The current outbreak is largely confined to three West African countries – Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea – but there have been two cases of transmission in the U.S. in two Dallas healthcare workers who cared for a patient who was diagnosed with Ebola upon returning from Liberia. Back to top

3. What are the symptoms associated with Ebola?
Symptoms of Ebola are largely similar to those of the flu but more severe. They include fever, severe headache, muscle pain, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain and unexplained bruising/bleeding. Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days from exposure, but the average onset of symptoms occurs in 8 to 10 days. Back to top

4. Will survival rates for Ebola patients be better in the U.S. than they are in West Africa?
It is still unknown what the real difference will be, however, health care facilities in the United States are better equipped to both treat the symptoms and isolate the patients in order to prevent the spread of the virus. Back to top

5. Why do some people survive Ebola while others do not?
This is still unknown. People with higher levels of the Ebola virus in their systems are more likely to suffer complications, including death. Pregnant women seem to have a particularly difficult time combating the infection. Recovery from Ebola also depends on good supportive care and the patient’s immune response. People who recover from Ebola develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years, possibly longer, according to the CDC. Back to top

6. What is the likelihood of Texas Children’s treating an Ebola patient in the near future?
There is no clear way to determine when a possible case of Ebola would arrive at Texas Children’s. However, because of the rate of transmission of the virus and the direct international travel from Africa to Houston, it is likely Texas Children’s will be responsible for the care of Ebola patients in the near future and is preparing for such an event. Back to top

TEXAS CHILDREN’S PREPAREDNESS

1. How is Texas Children’s preparing for the possibility of receiving a patient with Ebola?
Texas Children’s has developed a rapid response team of experts responsible for remaining updated on the best available protocols and ensuring designated nurses, physicians, and other staff members are prepared to care for a possible case of Ebola at Texas Children’s. We have developed specific protocols outlining the steps staff will take if we receive a patient with Ebola symptoms. We have designated isolation rooms where we will safely care for these patients. We’ve also secured all the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), including full-coverage protective suits, to prevent contamination or infection of our health care staff. Staff who work in areas most likely to come into contact with a suspected Ebola patient are receiving the appropriate training to screen and/or care for these patients. However, most staff and employees will never come in contact with an Ebola patient that may be treated here, so it is not necessary for everyone to receive training. Back to top

2. Where would we care for a patient with Ebola?
In order to decrease the risk of exposure, provide the complex care required, and to optimize the training of those who will care for patients with Ebola, Texas Children’s Hospital has determined that the nurses and physicians in the Emergency Centers and the Pediatric ICUs will be responsible for the care of these patients and will receive intense, ongoing training and simulation to prepare for the care of patients with Ebola virus. Nursing and physician leaders at the Pavilion for Women are working collaboratively with partners across the Texas Medical Center to determine the right placement, care, and treatment for expectant mothers with suspected Ebola. Back to top

SCREENING

1. How are patients being screened at the Information or Welcome Desks?
Staff members that work at points of entry into the hospital are receiving training related to the appropriate screening processes for Ebola. We are actively screening every patient that enters our system at all locations. The screening focuses on travel in the past twenty-one days to Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. Back to top

2. How will Blood Bank handle type and screens? Will there be designated equipment to handle blood samples?
In order to provide safe and efficient care, patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola that require blood products will not receive type and screens prior to transfusion. All patients with Ebola will receive O negative blood. Back to top

3. Are people that are screening patients for Ebola wearing PPE?
Ebola is only transmitted via direct contact with blood and body fluids, so there is no special PPE required for screening patients for Ebola. Anytime a patient has blood and body fluids visible, standard precautions should be followed. Back to top

4. Why are we not screening visitors and how are we ensuring the typical screening process is occurring after hours? Will the screening process change if additional countries have outbreaks?
We are not actively screening visitors for travels to the affected countries in Africa. Because symptoms associated with the virus are severe, it is highly unlikely that someone with Ebola would be visiting another patient in the hospital. If additional countries are considered to be part of the outbreak, we will update our screening questions accordingly. All visitors at Texas Children’s Hospital are screened on a routine basis for symptoms of any infectious disease. Remember, Ebola is only contagious when a patient is showing symptoms. Back to top

5. How are we adjusting to the newly-released updated PPE recommendations?
Texas Children’s has implemented infection control practices above and beyond the initial recommendations for care of Ebola patients. Updated recommendations were recently released related to PPE and we are well-positioned to adapt this new guidance into practice. The updated PPE recommendations are intended for caregivers who will be providing direct care for any suspected or confirmed patients infected with Ebola. There are no recommended changes for PPE for caregivers in areas that will not care for patients with Ebola.
We are actively working to adapt our supplies and training to augment our ongoing preparedness and response efforts. As part of effort, we are changing our practices related to two components: 1) use of additional PPE to ensure zero skin exposure, 2) use of PAPR (Powered Air Purifying Respirator). We will continue to train and practice doning and doffing PPE with our existing supplies while we await the arrival of our order of new equipment. We are also working with partners across the Texas Medical Center as we procure these supplies. Back to top

6. What is the screening process if a mother arrives for precipitous delivery?
The leaders and physicians within the Pavilion for Women are currently working to modify treatment algorithms based on what we know about Ebola and the survival statistics for the pregnant mother and neonate. Additional information regarding screening and the response within the Pavilion for Women will be forthcoming. Back to top

7. Will there be signage posted for visitors discouraging them from visiting if they have symptoms of illness similar to signage used during the H1N1 flu season?
At this time, we have not established the need for passive signage to discourage sick visitors from entering our facilities. All nursing units are conducting active screening for general illness and our focus remains on ensuring that screening is conducted consistently and thoroughly. Back to top

8. What are Texas Children’s protocols for screening patients for Ebola?
Staff in the Emergency Centers at both Main and West campuses and entry areas in the Pavilion for Woman are actively screening all patients for possible Ebola exposure. Anyone who has traveled to Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea in West Africa within the past 21 days is considered at risk and is immediately isolated. After isolation procedures are initiated, additional screening occurs and Infection Control is notified. The patient must be cleared by Infection Control in order to be removed from isolation. All patients transported to Texas Children’s by the Houston Fire Department paramedics are screened prior to arrival in the EC.
We plan to launch this active screening process for all portals of entry across the system, including all Ambulatory areas starting on Monday, October 20th, 2014. Back to top

9. What happens if a patient’s screening is positive and they have suspected Ebola?
Any patient with suspected Ebola will be immediately isolated in a pre-designated room, Infection Control will be notified, and additional screening will occur. Once deemed appropriate, the patient will be transported to a pre-designated room where they will remain until their treatment is completed. At the West Campus, the patient will be transported to the PICU and cared for by the nurses and physicians there. At the Main Campus, the patient will be transported to the PCU and cared for by nurses and physicians from the PICU. Since patients will only be placed and cared for in these units, other units do not need to designate isolated space for Ebola patients or receive extensive training. Back to top

10. How are our Ambulatory practices and Perioperative areas being prepped for a situation where a patient with Ebola presents at one of their locations?
Our pediatric and OB/GYN practices, clinics within the Clinical Care Center, our urgent care centers, other community centers, and procedural areas are being educated and informed on proper screening protocols and isolation methods should a suspected case of Ebola present at one of their locations. However, the care of that patient would not take place within these facilities. Back to top

11. Are we screening visitors for Ebola?
Although we are not actively screening all visitors for travels to the affected regions in Africa, all visitors at Texas Children’s Hospital are screened on a routine basis for signs and symptoms of any infectious disease. This screening occurs before visitors are allowed entry into the inpatient units. The screening includes questions about symptoms such as fever, cough, runny nose, and vomiting.
Remember, Ebola is only contagious when a patient is showing symptoms. Because symptoms associated with the virus are severe, it is highly unlikely that someone with Ebola would be visiting another patient in the hospital. Back to top

PERSONAL SAFETY OF THE HEALTH CARE TEAM
The information below is current as of the posted date. As new information is available, some of the procedures detailed below may change. Please check back regularly for updated information.

1. Why is the PPE used here different from that in Africa and why does it vary from the PPE recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention?
There is a wide range of PPE available. Some is more suitable for clinical settings in places such as Africa where the hygienic conditions often mean the lack of running water, the presence of large amounts of body fluids, and a vast number of infected patients. Other PPE is better fit for hospitals such as Texas Children’s where hygienic conditions are top notch, medications and trained personnel are readily available and the number of infected patients is low or nonexistent.
Clinical leadership in collaboration with infection control personnel at Texas Children’s reviewed PPE recommended by national experts and chose equipment that is most suitable for clinical care here at the hospital. The equipment provides the best protection for our staff and can easily be put on and taken off to reduce the risk of contamination.
The CDC’s guidelines state that a powered and supplied air respirator (PAPR) or an N95 respirator or mask that filters 95 percent of airborne particulates is recommended for aerosolized procedures. For most other care, the advantage of the respirators is comfort. At Texas Children’s, we are working to acquire PAPRs so we can provide a greater level of comfort and ease to our staff when and if they provide care to patients with Ebola or similar infectious diseases.
We are 100 percent confident that our staff is well protected wearing our current PPE. As the recommendations for such equipment changes, we will amend our protocols and obtain all necessary PPE to keep our employees safe. Back to top

2. How are we adjusting to the newly-released updated PPE recommendations?
Texas Children’s has implemented infection control practices above and beyond the initial recommendations for care of Ebola patients. Updated recommendations were recently released related to PPE and we are well-positioned to adapt this new guidance into practice. The updated PPE recommendations are intended for caregivers who will be providing direct care for any suspected or confirmed patients infected with Ebola. There are no recommended changes for PPE for caregivers in areas that will not care for patients with Ebola.
We are actively working to adapt our supplies and training to augment our ongoing preparedness and response efforts. As part of effort, we are changing our practices related to two components: 1) use of additional PPE to ensure zero skin exposure, 2) use of PAPR (Powered Air Purifying Respirator). We will continue to train and practice doning and doffing PPE with our existing supplies while we await the arrival of our order of new equipment. We are also working with partners across the Texas Medical Center as we procure these supplies. Back to top

3. What steps are being taken to make sure our employees will remain safe in the case that we receive an Ebola patient?
While caring for our patient’s remains our top duty at Texas Children’s, we are also intensely focused on protecting our physicians, nurses, and staff. Our team of internal experts is working closely with leaders within Texas Children’s and across the nation to implement the best available protocols correctly. The extensive training and education that is occurring focuses on equipping our staff to safely care for a patient with Ebola here at Texas Children’s. Personal protective equipment is readily available and frontline employees are being trained on the proper use of this gear, including how to put it on and take it off when entering and leaving an isolation room. We will use PPE practice drills as well as simulation to ensure competency of all employees who will be caring for these patients. Education and communication is an important aspect of this preparation and we are doing everything possible to stay up to date with the latest information and share it with those who would be directly responsible for patient care. As new information becomes available, leaders will work to quickly understand any new recommendations, make changes, and communicate those changes. Back to top

4. Which employees are being trained to care for patients with Ebola?
Employees in the Emergency Centers, PICUs, and Ambulatory areas are receiving on-going training for the screening and isolation of possible Ebola patients. Due to the critical nature of the patient’s condition, only healthcare workers in the ECs and PICUs will receive in-depth education and training for the clinical care of the patient.All staff are asked to stay up-to-date on information being shared on Ebola internally on the Connect site, the nursing blog (Voice of Nursing), as well as huddles with leadership. Unless you work in one of the designated areas within Texas Children’s Hospital, you should not be in contact with Ebola patients. As with all contagious illnesses, the best strategy for prevention is good hand hygiene and proper use of personal protective equipment in all situations where you may come into contact with bodily fluids. Back to top

5. After caring for the patient with Ebola, how do I decontaminate myself before I leave TCH?
All staff members assigned to care for a patient with the Ebola virus will change from their personal scrubs to hospital scrubs upon arrival to the patient care unit. At the end of their shift, those who have cared for a patient with Ebola will remove these hospital scrubs, shower on the unit, and redress in their personal clothing prior to leaving Texas Children’s Hospital. We have established a buddy system to ensure compliance with the very strict PPE protocols. This ensures proper PPE protection and decreases the risk to caregivers.Hospital scrubs, towels, and other linens utilized by employees will be handled according to protocol. Back to top

6. Once I’ve cared for a patient with Ebola, is it safe to return home without exposing my family?
All staff members that are exposed to an Ebola patient are required to maintain infection surveillance for 21 days by monitoring for fever twice daily. Remember, Ebola can only be transmitted when there are active signs and symptoms of the disease. Therefore, transmission to your loved ones is not possible without fever. During the 21 day surveillance period, you can return home and resume your normal schedule and activities. Back to top

CARE AND TREATMENT OF EBOLA PATIENTS

1. Will we receive or send patients to/from other hospitals? What will happen if a woman at the Pavilion for Women is suspected to have Ebola?
Texas Children’s is working collaboratively with other institutions in the Texas Medical Center, across Houston as well as other health care facilities across the state to ensure all Ebola patients receive proper care. Any transfer requests will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women is collaborating with our adult hospital partners to determine the right procedures for pregnant women with suspected Ebola. Additional information will be forthcoming to those working in Women’s Services. Back to top

2. What are our transportation protocols within the hospital for possible Ebola patients?
Patients will not be transferred within any areas of the facility outside of the EC and PICU/PCU. After an Ebola patient arrives at Texas Children’s Hospital, they will be taken to the PICU/PCU where they will be treated until they are discharged. Back to top

3. What happens if we have more than one patient with Ebola at a time? Is there more than one bed designated to care for these patients?
We can expand bed capacity based on the volume of patients that need this specialized level of care. The teams directly responsible for the care of patients with Ebola have established contingency plans that address the need for additional bed capacity. Back to top

4. Will we transfer the patient to one of the “specialized” hospitals?
On 10/16, Governor Rick Perry announced initial recommendations for containment and care of diagnosed Ebola patients in Texas. A task force established by the governor recommended state designation of Ebola Treatment Centers equipped to treat and care for adult patients with confirmed Ebola. The task force has not made recommendations for the care of pediatric patients or pregnant women. They are studying the matter and will have additional recommendations soon. In the meantime, Texas Children’s is maintaining its focus on the preparedness plans already in place. Back to top

5. Can a staff person who cares for an Ebola patient stay at the hospital if he/she chooses to?
Based on current information regarding Ebola, experts in the care of this type of patient do not feel that this level of precaution is necessary. Remember that Ebola is not contagious and cannot be transmitted unless symptoms are present, so there is no risk of transmission to family members if you are not ill. Members of the Infection Control team will communicate directly with all healthcare workers that have cared for a patient with Ebola. All questions by these individual caregivers will be addressed on a one-on-one basis. Back to top

6. Can family members of suspected Ebola patients stay with them? How many? Do they need PPE?
Texas Children’s strives to maintain an environment focused on family centered care. Therefore, we will allow family members to remain with the patient during their hospitalization. The number of visitors and their activities will be handled on a case-by-case basis based on the patient and family member’s health status. Infection Control is currently reviewing recommendations related to PPE of visitors and will provide additional guidance. Back to top

7. If I take care of an Ebola patient and then return to work, will I take care of other patients or is there a quarantine period?
Texas Children’s Hospital has not established a quarantine period because Ebola is not contagious and cannot be transmitted unless symptoms are present. There is no risk of transmission to other patients, visitors, or your coworkers if you do not have symptoms such as fever. Back to top

8. Who is part of the “Ebola” core team?
The Emergency Centers and Pediatric ICUs have developed a core team that will lead ongoing preparatory efforts, train “super users” in the use of Ebola specific PPE, and direct efforts related to care of the patient with Ebola. However, nurses and physicians in these areas are being trained and will be expected to participate in the care of patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola. Back to top

9. What is the treatment regimen for an Ebola patient?
Currently, there are no specific vaccines, medications, or treatments that have been proven effective against Ebola. At this point, the care for these patients includes supportive care and treatment of symptoms. These interventions include: oral and IV hydration, electrolyte therapy, treatment of secondary infections, maintenance of oxygen status, and blood pressure support. These treatments have shown to improve likelihood of survival, but there is no cure for Ebola.
Some experimental drugs and therapies have been used with Ebola patients. These options will be considered on a patient-by-patient basis in coordination with industry experts.
In order to minimize the risk of exposure, the patient will not be transported to diagnostic tests, surgery, or procedural areas. Invasive procedures will be carefully considered and discussed. Knowing that these treatments have not proven to combat the virus, if we cannot safely perform a procedure, we will not do so. In these situations, we will engage our ethicists for review and recommendations. Back to top

10. Can a healthcare worker refuse to care for a patient with Ebola?
It is our duty to care for every patient at Texas Children’s no matter what the condition. Texas Children’s leaders are taking every measure possible to protect physicians, nurses, staff, and employees who would care for a patient with suspected or confirmed Ebola. We are confident we have the right team, the right equipment and state-of-the-art programs to provide the highest level of care to the patient while protecting other patients, their families and our Texas Children’s family. Back to top

11. Will health care workers who care for an Ebola patient treat other patients? What is the staffing plan?
Our goal is to limit the risk of exposure to our other patients and staff. Therefore, all Ebola patients will be cared for by a dedicated team that is not caring for any other patients. In the critical care setting, we anticipate that two nurses and one physician will provide continual care to this patient. Other members of the team will be involved in the patient’s care only if the care required cannot safely be performed by the nurses and physicians assigned to the patient. Infection Control specialists and their designee will be a crucial part of this team and will monitor all PPE use to ensure adherence with all protocols.Entry into the patient’s room will be restricted, and non-critical personnel – such as students, environmental services, dietary, etc. – will not be allowed access. Due to the criticality of strict PPE protocols, a buddy system will be initiated. Removal of PPE will be a two-person process, with one caregiver assisting the other. This ensures proper removal, decreases the risk of exposure, and promotes safety. In addition, members of the Infection Control team or their designee will act as observers to ensure protocols are not breached and to provide direction to ensure safe removal of PPE.The patient will be provided consistent caregivers to maximize expertise and minimize the risk of exposure. Those caring for the patient will follow very specific protocols to remove isolation garb and take breaks every three to four hours. An official entry and exit log will be maintained to catalog all movement into the patient’s room. Back to top

12. What isolation equipment will be used by staff?
Those providing direct care to these patients will utilize an impervious jumpsuit, gloves, eye protection, face mask, and shoe covers. We will use tape at the top of the gloves and shoe covers to create a seal and to decrease risk of exposure. Special Ebola isolation carts have been designed to make all needed equipment readily available in the units that will provide care to patients with Ebola. Additional PPE may be recommended based on the particular patient’s status and risk factors. Infection Control or their designee will be present on the unit to oversee use of PPE and the removal of PPE. Ambulatory areas will be conducting Ebola screening at the point of entry. If the patient has a positive screening, Ambulatory caregivers will utilize standard isolation gowns, face masks, goggles, gloves, and shoe covers. As part of the Ambulatory protocol, patients that have suspected Ebola will be handed off to a specialized, trained team. Back to top

EDUCATION AND EBOLA UPDATES

1. How do we educate other patient families worried about their children being here in the case of a confirmed Ebola patient?
We will engage our leadership and communications team to properly educate other patient families without violating patient privacy rules. Back to top

2. How can I stay abreast of what we are doing at Texas Children’s regarding Ebola preparation, training, etc.?
We are committed to keeping everyone at Texas Children’s informed about our plans and developments in this ongoing situation. Please check Connect regularly for the most current, relevant information. We are posting stories and resources on the Connect intranet site and on the external Connect news site at www.texaschildrensnews.org, which is accessible from any computer or mobile device at any time. Other sources of information include the nursing blog (Voice of Nursing), as well as huddles and meetings with your leadership team. Back to top

3. What should I do if the media contacts or questions me?
Please do not respond to the media and refer all inquiries to Christy Brunton at 281-684-3184. Back to top

4. Who can I contact if I still have questions?
If you have questions about our plan or about Ebola, please email them to connectnews@texaschildrens.org. The communications team will route questions to the leaders of our response and readiness team to get answers and provide updated information to our organization. Back to top